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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 158

Documentation of concept of isolation/quarantine in Ayurveda


Research officer (Ay.), Regional Ayurveda Research Institute (CCRAS), Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

Date of Submission05-Sep-2020
Date of Acceptance03-Feb-2021
Date of Web Publication18-Mar-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Praveen Balakrishnan
Regional Ayurveda Research Institute (CCRAS), Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jacr.jacr_66_20

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How to cite this article:
Balakrishnan P. Documentation of concept of isolation/quarantine in Ayurveda. J Ayurveda Case Rep 2020;3:158

How to cite this URL:
Balakrishnan P. Documentation of concept of isolation/quarantine in Ayurveda. J Ayurveda Case Rep [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Apr 15];3:158. Available from: http://www.ayucare.org/text.asp?2020/3/4/158/311505



Sir,

Communicable diseases, also known as infectious diseases, contagious diseases and transmissible diseases,[1] are always a threat to human health since time immemorial. They remain a serious threat to health of the public which may even result in high mortality.[2] The recent SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is one such communicable disease that engendered global attention. The disease has a very rapid spread.[3] As on January 30, 2021, there are 101,561,219 cases globally, and 2,196,944 people have lost their lives.[4] To prevent the spread of the infectious disease, quarantine or isolation has been advised as an important step.[5]

Ayurveda, probably, has first described communicable health issues that spread across large community of people denoted by the term “Janapadodhwamsam.[6],[7],[8] These transmissible diseases (Sankramanti naraatnaram) are termed as Oupasargika roga or Sankramika roga[9] and includes the spectrum of Jvara (~fever), Kusta (~skin diseases), Abhishyanda (~conjunctivitis), Shosha (~tuberculosis), Masurika (~smallpox), and Sheetala (~a variety of Masurika).[9],[10],[11]

Any disease, whether communicable or not, should be prevented from spreading at the very early stage.[12] In the context of treatment of a communicable disease, isolation of the afflicted person to a clean separate room is advised as the first and foremost treatment line for preventing its spread (Rahasi svapayet).[13] Infected person should be isolated/quarantined (Na cha tasya antikam vrajet) from healthy people or people who are having less immunity or with no proper protective gears (Na ashuchi samsprishet tam). This highlights that historically the concept of isolation/quarantine of established/suspected cases of communicable diseases has been scientifically documented as its protocol for management in Ayurveda.



 
  References Top

1.
Infectious Diseases - Latest Research and News | Nature. (n.d.). Available from: https://www.nature.com/subjects/infectious-diseases/. [Last accessed on 2020 Mar 14].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Bagherian H, Farahbakhsh M, Rabiei R, Moghaddasi H, Asadi F. National communicable disease surveillance system: A review on information and organizational structures in developed countries. Acta Inform Med 2017;25:271-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Guan WJ, Ni ZY, Hu Y, Liang WH, Ou CQ, He JX, et al. Clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 in China. N Engl J Med 2020;382:1708-20.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
World Health Organization. World Health Organization Disease (Covid-19) Dashboard. Available from: https://covid19.who.int/. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 30].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. USA: Quarantine and Isolation; 2017 Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 30].  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Gokani T. Ayurveda - The science of healing. Headache 2014;54:1103-6.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Acharya JT, editor. Charaka Samhita by Agnivesa, Vimana Sthana. Ch. 3., Ver. 04. Varanasi: Chaukhambha Orientalia; 2011. p. 240.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Samal J. Fundamental tenets of epidemiology in Ayurveda and their contemporary relevance. Indian J Health Sci 2016;9:20.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Acharya JT, editor. Sushruta Samhita of Sushruta, Nidana Sthana. Ch. 5., Ver. 33-34. Varanasi: Chaukhambha Orientalia; 2011. p. 289.   Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Acharya JT, editor. Sushruta Samhita of Sushruta, Uttara Sthana. Ch. 41, Ver. 05. Varanasi: Chaukhambha Orientalia; 2011. p. 711.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Lakshmipathy S. Yogaratnakara with Vidyotini Hindi Commentary; Uttarardham; Sheetala Chikitsa. 1st ed., Ver. 01. Varanasi: Chowkhambha Prakashan; 2013. p. 266.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
Acharya JT, editor. Commentary Nibandhasangraha of Delhana on Sushruta Samhita of Sushruta, Sutra Sthana. Ch. 21., Ver. 37. Varanasi: Chaukhambha Orientalia; 2011. p. 206.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Lakshmipathy S. Yogaratnakara with Vidyotini Hindi Commentary. Uttarardham; Sheetala Cikitsa. 1st ed., Ver. 06. Varanasi: Chowkhambha Prakashan; 2013. p. 266.  Back to cited text no. 13
    




 

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